Get To Know Your PT: Annika Piros, DPT

Annika Piros DPT

Therapydia Tanasbourne physical therapist Annika Piros, DPT takes some time to talk about what surprised her most about being a physical therapist, her Saturday morning routine and her plans for future education.

Surround yourself with a community that models healthy behaviors and it will be difficult to make an unhealthy choice.

When did you know that you wanted to be a physical therapist?

I always pictured myself entering the medical field because of my fascination of the human body. Through my experience working as a CrossFit coach, I developed a passion for coaching movement and biomechanics. What eventually drew me to physical therapy was when my sister suffered a “terrible triad” knee injury in high school. I attended her PT appointments with her and was impressed by the care that my sister received from her physical therapist. It solidified my desire to enter the profession!

What’s your favorite song to get you motivated?

“Remember the Name” by Fort Minor for workouts and the brain.fm app when I’m trying to focus.

What is the biggest challenge involved in being a PT?

Staying up to date on the latest physical therapy literature & evidence. I believe this is crucial in order to provide patients the best possible care.

How do you like to stay active?

CrossFit, HIIT, cycle classes, olympic & weight lifting.

What surprised you the most about the physical therapist profession?

How much we know and yet don’t seem to know… there is always an opportunity to learn more. PTs are lifelong learners!

Are you currently pursuing any further education/certifications?

I am currently looking at NAIOMT courses and the USAW Level 1 certification.

What’s your go-to breakfast?

Lately it’s been “veggie cakes” that are filled with eggs, zucchini, carrots, and other delicious veggies.

What do you wish everyone knew about physical therapy?

I wish everyone knew about direct access to physical therapy! Meaning, you don’t need a doctor’s referral to see a physical therapist in the diagnosis & treatment of a musculoskeletal condition. In many cases, seeing a physical therapist first saves patients time and money as it is a safe & effective treatment for pain.

What is the most important personality trait that a therapist must have?

Being an empathic listener. Building a trusting patient-provider relationship is essential for effective treatment.

What do you do to de-stress/unwind?

Self-care which includes a good sweat-session, going for walks near my home in wine-country, and spending time with my husband.

Finish this sentence: On Saturday mornings, you can usually find me…

Catching a CrossFit class & enjoying a cup of coffee!

What is your favorite piece of wellness advice to offer?

Surround yourself with a community that models healthy behaviors and it will be difficult to make an unhealthy choice. The “5 chimps theory” put this into perspective for me which basically states that you are the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with.

Learn more about Annika and our other Therapydia Tanasbourne physical therapists.

Get To Know Your PT: Ryan Eckert, PT, DPT, CSCS

Ryan Eckert, PT, DPT, CSCS

Therapydia Pearl physical therapist Ryan Eckert, PT, DPT CSCS, takes some time to talk about how he knew physical therapy was the career for him, how he stays active and the importance of communication with his patients.

Move Well and Move Often.

When did you know that you wanted to be a physical therapist?

I knew physical therapy was the career for me while in my undergraduate program at UCSD. After gaining the experience of problem solving my own pain and limitations while being a college athlete along with volunteering at a PT clinic helped to spark the passion. From there it has been just part of my life learning more and more about the career and aspects of it.

What’s your favorite song to get you motivated?

My girlfriend and I’s song to get us motivated and going on weekend mornings is New Light by John Mayer. If you watch the music video it will help to understand.

What is the biggest challenge involved in being a PT?

The biggest challenge I think is that you are working with a human being. That means is that every single one of us is different and unique so there is no one way that a specific injury or surgery needs to be treated. This makes it a challenge but also makes it fun and constantly different day to day.

How do you like to stay active?

I like to keep a minimalist strength plan to allow me to always try new and different outdoor activities that spark my interest. The newest one I am getting into is rock climbing and I’m excited to explore Portland trying it.

What surprised you the most about the physical therapist profession?

How important communication is with all aspects of physical therapy. Without correct and efficient communication it does not matter how skilled or smart you are the communication is the deciding factor in the patient’s level of improvement.

Are you currently pursuing any further education/certifications?

I am currently taking the functional capacity screen (FCS) online course to help understand and work with higher level patients in returning to sport and more demanding life and work tasks. I also plan on taking some additional manual therapy, pain science, and StrongFirst courses.

What’s your go-to breakfast?

Freshly ground pour over coffee made into bulletproof coffee with some collagen protein. If I need extra food I will have fried eggs with cheese and avocado.

What do you wish everyone knew about PT?

I wish everyone knew that you do not need pain to need PT. If you have any movement limitations affecting your life we are the experts to help work with you to correct those impairments to achieve your goals no matter how big or small.

What is the most important personality trait that a PT must have?

The need to be a good listener and quick thinker. I think these two go together to be able to fully listen to what the client is telling you and to be able to process that information quickly.

What do you do to de-stress/unwind?

Some movement or activity that requires complete focus like rock climbing and mountain biking to help clear my mind and reset.

Finish this sentence: On Saturday mornings, you can usually find me… 

Hiking or Paddle Boarding with my girlfriend.

What is your favorite piece of wellness advice to offer?

Move Well and Move Often from Gray Cook and the group at functional movement systems.

Get To Know Your PT: Elaina Gayles, PT, DPT

Get To Know Your PT Elaina Gayles, PT, DPT

Therapydia Lake Oswego physical therapist Elaina Gayles, PT, DPT, takes some time to talk about her Saturday morning routine, her favorite pump up song and when she realized she wanted to become a physical therapist.

To stay active doing whatever activity you enjoy most. And to do it often!

When did you know that you wanted to be a physical therapist?

I knew I wanted to help people and work in healthcare since I was in high school when I was dealing with my own injuries while also taking my first anatomy classes. A mentor recommended I look into the field of physical therapy early in my college career and I haven’t looked back since. I learned that we get to spend quality time with our patients, help people achieve long term goals, and utilize movement to contribute to improving the health of our communities.

What’s your favorite song to get you motivated?

You Make My Dreams – Hall and Oates

What is the biggest challenge involved in being a PT?

One of the biggest challenges is tailoring treatment to the personalities of each patient. For example, for one session I may need to be more of a coach and the next session I may need to be more of a teacher.

How do you like to stay active?

First and foremost I enjoy being outside, whether it be hiking, riding my bike, or tossing a frisbee on the beach. I believe strength training is vital as well and I enjoy a challenging group fitness class, such as cycling, for the endorphin rush too!

What surprised you the most about the physical therapist profession?

Before getting my doctorate in physical therapy, I had no idea how much knowledge PTs had about the entire body. A DPT is able to diagnose and treat most musculoskeletal issues but can also refer our to other medical providers based on the medical screening tools we have. This allows us to see patients without a physician referral.

Are you currently pursuing any further education/certifications?

I am seeking continuing education in concussion and vestibular rehabilitation. I find our nervous system fascinating and I think this population does not always get the medical attention they deserve.

What’s your go-to breakfast?

Avocado toast with an over-easy egg or two.

What do you wish everyone knew about physical therapy? 

I wish more people understood that PT is not just manual therapy and exercise. I believe our most important role is our ability to educate people about what is going on in their bodies and this cannot be replicated with internet research or generalized exercise.

What is the most important personality trait that a therapist must have?

A PT must be able to connect with people and demonstrate empathy in a variety of situations.

What do you do to de-stress/unwind?

Spending time outside, exercise, painting, and drawing.

Finish this sentence: On Saturday mornings, you can usually find me…

Sleeping in!

What is the best piece of wellness advice you’ve ever received?

To stay active doing whatever activity you enjoy most. And to do it often!

 

Learn more about Elaina and our other Therapydia Lake Oswego physical therapists.

Astym: Manual Therapy Technique

ASTYM Manual Therapy Technique

Therapydia is pleased to announce that Tannasbourne Physical Therapist, Kimberly P. Mineo, PT, DPT, OCS has completed the Astym certification. Astym is an evidence-based rehab program specifically designed to treat degenerative tendinitis and scar tissue that can interfere with recovery after surgery or injury.

Manual therapy is a hands on technique often used by physical therapists to treat joints and soft tissues of the body. Manual therapy allows for an increased range of motion of the joints, mobilization of both the soft tissue and joints, and reduces swelling and inflammation among other benefits. 

There are multiple different types of manual therapy techniques that a physical therapist will utilize during treatment of their patients. One of these techniques is Augmented Soft Tissue Mobilization or Astym.

What Is Astym?

The Astym System uses specialized tools to stimulate the body to regenerate and promote healing which in turn decreases symptoms, including pain, and enhances mobility to keep patients active throughout their recovery. 

Astym therapy has proven itself effective in the treatment of lateral epicondylosis (tennis elbow), medial epicondylosis (golfer’s elbow), carpal tunnel syndrome, plantar fasciitis, chronic ankle sprains, shin splints and post-op joint replacements, to name a few.

How Does Astym Work?
Your physical therapist will use the Astym tools to glide over your muscles and tendons to stimulate a healing response and mobilize tissue below the skin. The Astym treatment is unique in that the entire extremity or gross movement area is treated versus solely the injured or painful area. After treatment, you will be given specific stretches and possibly other exercises to promote healthy movement.

A word from Kimberly Mineo, DPT:

“Astym has become an integral part of my practice. The time is takes to treat certain injuries, especially ones that are chronic in nature, has improved significantly. An aspect of Astym which I appreciate as a physical therapist, is that activity is encouraged after treatment. Sometimes movement can be less painful immediately afterwards.”

If you have any questions about the Astym physical therapy system or would like to know if Astym may be a good treatment option for you, please contact Therapydia Tanasbourne at 503-606-8849 or email Kimberly@TherapydiaTanasbourne.com

Physician referral may or may not be required depending on your insurance.

Get To Know Your PT- Tyler Baca, PT, DPT

Physical therapist, tyler baca, pt, dpt

Therapydia Beaverton physical therapist Tyler Baca, PT, DPT, takes some time to talk about staying active, future education plans and what song pumps him up.

You don’t have to be perfect to get great results.”

When did you know that you wanted to be a physical therapist?

I got the opportunity to work with populations ranging from elite runners to people with lower extremity prostheses during my involvement with a biomechanics lab at the University of Oregon. The praise that these individuals had for their physical therapists was overwhelming. Through this experience and my observation of local physical therapists, I was certain that physical therapy would be a career that I would thrive in. 

What surprised you the most about the physical therapy profession?

I have been surprised the most by the subtle impacts that a physical therapist or any health care provider can make in an individual’s life. The provider sets patients’ expectations not only by the explanations he/she gives, but by the language and attitude that is used.

How do you like to stay active?

I enjoy CrossFit, olympic lifting, hiking, stand up paddle boarding, and walking as a means of commuting when possible. 

What is the biggest challenge involved in being a PT?

Remembering names.

What’s your favorite song to get you motivated?

“Eye of the Tiger”

FACT: listened to this song before every test in graduate school.

Are you currently pursuing any further education or certifications?

I am pursuing further education in the Institute of Clinical Excellence. I am looking to further the clinical knowledge I can provide to barbell/CrossFit athletes as well as individuals who are looking for/in need of a new exercise routine. I am hoping to gain more tools to show all patients how much their bodies are capable of.

What’s your go-to breakfast?

Toast, eggs, and vegetables with a protein shake.

What do you wish everyone knew about PT?

I wish that everyone knew that you can come to physical therapy first if you are experiencing pain or if you are looking to get an assessment of your current health and wellness.

In your opinion, what is the most important personality trait that a PT must have?

A good listener.

What do you do to de-stress/unwind?

Mindfully meditate: whether that is through meditation techniques, taking a walk, or pushing myself in intense exercise.

Finish this sentence: On Saturday mornings, you can usually find me…

At the CrossFit gym.

What is your favorite piece of wellness advice?

“You don’t have to be perfect to get great results.”

Learn more about Tyler and the other Therapydia Beaverton physical therapists.

Get to Know Your PT: Kimberly Mineo, DPT

hillsboro physical therapy kim mineo tanasbourne

Therapydia Tanasbourne physical therapist Kimberly Mineo, DPT, takes some time to talk about starting off as a physical therapy aide, the importance of keeping active, and relaxing with her kiddo.

“The long way is the short way in the long run.”

When did you know that you wanted to be a physical therapist?

After working as an aide at a beautiful clinic in Incline Village, NV – Lake Tahoe! I saw that I’d be able to take my passion for helping others become and stay active, to the next level.

What surprised you the most about the physical therapy profession?

We all really get along well together…wherever we are.

How do you like to stay active?

Running, cycling, hiking, Pilates, strength training, swimming, anything active in the ocean or the mountains is my fave!

What is the biggest challenge involved in being a PT?

Accepting that we don’t always know why injuries happen and being patient with how long they sometimes take to recover from.

What’s your favorite song to get you motivated?

“Take on Me” by A-ha. When this pops on when I’m out running, there’s always a kick in my pace!

Are you currently pursuing any further education or certifications?

Manual Certification with NAIOMT (North American Institute of Manual Therapy).

What’s your go-to breakfast?

Scrambled eggs, avocado toast and berries…and of course, coffee!

What do you wish everyone knew about PT?

That physical therapists do treat the spine.

In your opinion, what is the most important personality trait that a PT must have?

Being a patient, people-person.

What do you do to de-stress/unwind?

Cook a nice meal with a glass of wine, go for a run, sit down with a magazine that I don’t get to read too often like Magnolia or Sunset.

Finish this sentence: On Saturday mornings, you can usually find me…

Relaxing with my kiddo and cup of coffee before getting ready to head out on an adventure.

What is your favorite piece of wellness advice?

“The long way is the short way in the long run…find a way to enjoy being active, take the time to make it a consistent part of your life and enjoy the multitude of benefits.”

Learn more about Kimberly and the other Therapydia Tanasbourne physical therapists.

Get to Know Your PT – Nick Hadinger, DPT, USAW

physical therapy lake oswego

Therapydia Lake Oswego physical therapist Nick Hadinger, DPT, USAW, takes some time to talk about swimming, reading the emotions of his patients, and the variety of treatment styles in PT.

“I think changing the perception of our profession is important to really reach those who are active and need our help.”

When did you know that you wanted to be a physical therapist?

I started thinking about PT during my swimming career in college. I was frequently in and out of the training room with shoulder injuries and I once I dove into it, I loved that I could apply what I was learning about the body to myself and different activities I was doing to not only improve my health but my performance. After I saw the difference PT made in my brother’s life following a brain injury, I knew that I wanted to help people in the same way using all of the cool knowledge I’d learned.

What surprised you the most about the physical therapy profession?

How many different treatment styles there are was pretty surprising. Every practitioner has different strengths from past experiences or maybe it’s even just different heights and this can cause them to gravitate toward one treatment technique over another. At the end of the day, there are several ways to approach an injury and being able to educate your patients on what and why you’re doing something is most important.

How do you like to stay active?

I workout and/or swim most days of the week and enjoy hiking and snowboarding when I can.

What is the biggest challenge involved in being a PT?

I think the biggest challenge is that the general public does not fully understand what it is that a PT really does so they aren’t sure if they would benefit from it or not. If you have a body and you have an injury, PT can most certainly help and we really want to help because it’s what we love to do!

What’s your favorite song to get you motivated?

This changes for me all the time! Right now I’m into “The Sticks” by The Cadillac Three.

Are you currently pursuing any further education/certifications?

I’d like to become SFMA (Selective Functional Movement Assessment) certified in the near future.

What’s your go-to breakfast?

Eggs over medium, bacon, hash browns, and maybe a smoothie.

What do you wish everyone knew about physical therapy?

I wish everyone knew that PTs are equipped with the knowledge and skillset to address any muscle, tendon, or joint injury and that if they come to us first they could very well avoid that surgery, injection, or medication that they dread taking. In Australia, if your back hurts, everyone knows you go to see your physio but in the U.S., it doesn’t happen like that. I think changing the perception of our profession is important to really reach those who are active and need our help.

In your opinion, what is the most important personality trait that a PT must have?

You have to be patient and you have to be able to listen effectively to not only hear what your patients are saying but read their emotions about what they’re saying as well. Creating a trusting patient-provider relationship is #1.

What do you do to de-stress/unwind?

I have to get in a pool. Swimming is a place for me to be alone and in my own thoughts and to problem solve and sort things out. Being underwater has always had this effect on me for some reason and helps bring clarity to a lot of issues.

Finish this sentence: On Saturday mornings, you can usually find me…

Searching for a spectacular Bloody Mary with brunch at an undiscovered restaurant in downtown.

What is your favorite piece of wellness advice?

If you had one vehicle to last you the rest of your life, how would you care for that vehicle to ensure it lasts? That vehicle is your body and you only get one of them.

Learn more about Nick and the other Therapydia Lake Oswego physical therapists.

Get to Know Your PT: Jessica Manley, PT, DPT

Jessica Manley Portland Physical Therapist Pearl

Therapydia Pearl physical therapist Jessica Manley, PT, DPT, takes some time to talk practicing yoga, empowering her patients, and hanging out with goats.

“Believe in the power of your body to heal.”

When did you know that you wanted to be a physical therapist?

As an undergraduate studying mostly ultimate frisbee, I was told by my teammates that I would probably like being a PT. Once I got myself into a clinic and saw what a PT could do, I was hooked.

What surprised you the most about the physical therapy profession?

The lack of general knowledge about what PT can do. I first learned about this as a student of physical therapy by watching others recover from injuries and then I had to rehab from my own. PT is a powerful medicine that is underutilized by many.

How do you like to stay active?

I practice yoga and I run and cycle. When the weather is hospitable, I love to explore the world via backpacking.

What is the biggest challenge involved in being a PT?

Time management and my own self care. Empowering patients to move, grow, and believe in themselves takes time and energy. I strive to maintain the balance between this passion of mine and ensuring that I also take care of myself and my family.

What’s your favorite song to get you motivated?

This is the hardest question for me! I love music and am constantly seeking out new tunes. Currently, my choice is “Fading” by Toro y Moi.

Are you currently pursuing any further education or certifications?

As a pelvic floor specialist, I’m constantly taking classes to continue to understand this hidden world. I have extensive training in Functional Mobilization techniques through the Institute in Physical Art and I hope to become certified in the future. I will also be pursuing training in visceral manipulation soon.

What’s your go-to breakfast?

Scrambled eggs with cheese.

What do you wish everyone knew about PT?

PT often is thought of as this conservative measure that likely won’t work and that surgery will be required. Sometimes that is true and sometimes PT is all you need. I hear from my patients that they are surprised at the results PT can yield—they even get more better results than they thought possible!

In your opinion, what is the most important personality trait that a PT must have?

Empathetic communication.

What do you do to de-stress/unwind?

Movement and meditation. Also, cooking and baking. Occasionally, hanging out with goats. 🙂

Finish this sentence: On Saturday mornings, you can usually find me…

Baking scones.

What is your favorite piece of wellness advice?

Believe in the power of your body to heal.

Learn more about Jessica and the other Therapydia Pearl physical therapists.

Get to Know Your PT: Brooke Flood, DPT, COMT

physical therapy Portland

Therapydia Portland physical therapist Brooke Flood, DPT, COMT, takes some time to talk keeping active, hanging with her kids, and the PT brain.

“Exercise to be strong and healthy, not to win.”

When did you know that you wanted to be a physical therapist?

In college. I spent enough time receiving physical therapy for various injuries that I decided to forgo medical school and pursue PT.

What is the biggest challenge involved in being a PT?

Turning off the “finding out what’s wrong with everything,” once I get home.

How do you like to stay active?

Walk, run, swim, cycle, row, lift weights, snowboard, kite surf, and play with my kids.

What’s your favorite song to get your motivated?

“Eye of the Tiger” by Survivor.

What surprised you the most about the physical therapy profession?

How much people don’t know about physical therapists and how we can help. We are biomechanical specialists!

What’s your go-to breakfast?

Banana with peanut butter and coffee (with cream and honey).

What is the most important personality trait that a PT must have?

Empathy.

What do you do to de-stress / unwind?

Run or walk outside.

Finish this sentence: On Saturday mornings, you can usually find me…

Drinking coffee with my husband, hanging out with our kids, getting ready for a fun family day.

What is your favorite piece of wellness advice?

Exercise to be strong and healthy, not to win.

Click here to learn more about Brooke and the other physical therapists at Therapydia Portland.

Balance: What is it Really and How Do I Improve It?

balance exercises physical therapy

By Kurt Gilbertson, DPT, XPS
Therapydia Lake Oswego Physical Therapist

If you’re reading this, then there’s a good chance that you’ve been told to improve your balance. You may be thinking to yourself: how did I get bad balance? Don’t I balance everyday? Where do I start?

Today, I’d like to (hopefully) simplify balance for you and answer some questions you may have, such as: Why do I tend to trip in the dark? Or, why do I veer left when looking right? To begin, let’s look at the balance system as a whole.

The balance system has three components: Visual, Vestibular and Somatosensory

Visual: This is the most obvious component in that you know that your balance is worse with your eyes closed or when it’s dark. This is because when your eyes are open, your brain relies on the information you see. It begins to interpret and integrate what is perceived into its own reality of space (balance). This means that when you’re relying on your sight to keep your balance, you will immediately sway once it is taken away. In a perfect world, your balance system would be able to maintain itself without visual input but how could it if it’s never been trained to do so? So, let’s train it. Luckily, training is as easy as performing this simple test:

If balance is a worry, please stand next to something secure and hold on if need be.

 

Everything done with eyes closed. You should be able to complete level 5 five times without falling over.

Do 1 -> 5 as you can for the test. The treatment is the level you fail at or the level under failure depending on how hard the the above test was.

1. Widebase
2. Narrow Base
3. Tandem
4. Single Leg
5. 5 Second Alternating March

When babies develop, the stimulus of movement guides their visual field development. The more they move, the more they see and interact with new depths of field. As we develop further, we tend to rely on the visual field to guide our movement, often so that our vision can begin to override other senses (vestibular, proprioception), which is why we tend to sway when balancing with our eyes closed.

Vestibular: This system is growing in public knowledge—unfortunately due to vertigo and increasing falls among the elderly population—but it can be confusing so lets make things easier by looking at the anatomy of the ear first:

Balance Physical Therapy Portland

Inside your ear are two systems: Cochlear (hearing) and Vestibular (equilibrium). Equilibrium is the sense of balance, feeling level or equal on both sides. In the above picture, locate the semicircular canals which stimulate the vestibular nerve. See how there are three? There are also three planes of movements. Remember the X/Y/Z axis in algebra? (Cue the great algebra memories) Those three axes are the three planes of those canals which are designed to stimulate your brain, via the vestibular nerve, to signal to your brain that you’re standing upright or you’re laying down or you’re looking left/right.

Refer to the picture below: these canals are filled with fluid that moves when your head moves, which then moves sensory receptors in your inner ear: calcium crystals and hair cells which communicate with the brain. The brain is the CEO and knows which canal is up/down, left/ right, and it decides to orient your mind and the rest of your senses to where you are facing. Those struggling with vertigo have hair cell stimuli telling them something that the rest of the senses disagree with, creating the dizziness and nausea symptoms. For those curious of vertigo (BPPV) and these crystals, view this video.

physical therapy balance portland

Now, onto how this influences your balance. If you stay in a small amount of positions without challenging your brain to interpret vestibular stimuli, it becomes maladaptive to vestibular stimuli. Which is fancy talk for when I look left, I sway and fall right.

The small amount of positions are typically sitting, standing and laying down while looking in the direction we are facing. Hardly ever do we move where we aren’t looking because we rely on the eyes. The vestibular stimulus always follows behind the visual stimulus, until it doesn’t, and then we lose balance. Let’s make that simple again by testing.

If balance is a worry, please stand next to something secure and hold on if need be. If you have prior history of neck or shoulder pain with head movements, start slow and contact a Therapydia physical therapist.

 

Everything done with eyes open. Head Turns and Head Nods stimulate the vestibular system. The faster you move your head the harder it is so start slow.
You should be able to complete level 4 five times (L/R & Up/Down) without falling over.

Do 1 -> 4 as you can for the test. The treatment is the level you fail at or the level under failure depending on how hard the the above test was.

1. Widebase
2. Narrow Base
3. Tandem
4. Single Leg

Luckily again, the test is the training.

Somatosensory: Somato = body. Sensory = physical perception. Somatosensory is your body’s physical awareness to stimulus. In regards to balance it has two components: proprioception and exteroception. The former being (per)ception of internal positioning and the latter being (per)ception of external stimuli. Both create the body’s awareness of itself in space, i.e spatial awareness. This is largely influenced by your sensory nerves especially in your feet of which there are millions of them that are constantly talking to your brain about temperature/ pressure/heat (extero) and movement on surfaces (proprio). We tend to spend most of our waking time in shoes which limits how much our feet sense the outside (external) world. We also tend to not move our bodies outside of comfortable positions so the proprioceptive awareness isn’t challenged and it begins to decrease.

Well, that got a bit confusing right? As long as you understand that what you are sensing is talking to your brain and if you limit the amount of time sensing new things, the body will react adversely to new stimuli. Let’s make it more simple by showing you how to improve the somatosensory system for balance which can be done through the movement (proprioceptive) component. See the test below.

If balance is a worry, please stand next to something secure and hold on if need be.

Remember the somatosensory system is challenged by different surfaces you are on. So this one incorporates the same positions (wide > narrow > tandem > single leg) as able but the challenge is increased by harder surfaces to balance on.

Start with a pillow at home, and at the gym there will be balancing pads, discs, and a BOSU. For those trying to do the disc or BOSU hold on first and please be careful. It gets wobbly!

 

You should be able to complete level 4 holding 60 seconds without falling over.

Do 1 -> 4 as you can for the test. The treatment is the level you fail at or the level under failure depending on how hard the above test was.

1. Widebase
2. Narrow Base
3. Tandem
4. Single Leg

And again, the test is the training.

Once a majority of the above trainings get easy, it’s much more fun to incorporate all them together.
Try these below. Have some fun with it but be safe. 🙂

1. Leg Movements (Eyes Open / Eyes Closed)

 

2. Leg Ball Circles (Eyes Open / Eyes Closed)

 

3. Arm Ball Circles (Eyes Open / Eyes Closed)

 

4. Ball Throws

 

If you read through this again you’ll see two common themes: Challenge Yourself and Use It or Lose It. Don’t rely on your eyes to determine 100% of what your perceiving, let your feet do some talking, and move with purpose in ways you’re not used to. You’ll be amazed at how quickly balance improves when it is properly challenged. If left unchallenged, don’t be surprised that your balance slowly deteriorates because why should it be good at something that it is never asked to do?